Our 2020 Conference will be broad in geographic scope, covering challenges and successes that impact and can influence all of North America

2020 NAISMA ANNUAL CONFERENCE

October 6-8, 2020

Members: check your email or visit the Members’ Area for a special link to your discounted registration

Dates and Daily Schedule for Invasive Species Management Conference

Note: Read the latest NAISMA Coronavirus update.

The 2020 NAISMA Annual Conference will be held on a virtual platform rather than our traditional in-person meeting in order to keep everyone safe and healthy.

The NAISMA Board of Directors, Staff, and Planning Committee are excited for this year’s opportunity to bring our high quality agenda, professional development, and networking opportunities to invasive species managers in North America and beyond. 

Invasive Species Management Conference Dates

The agenda will kick off on Tuesday, October 6 at 11:00 a.m. EDT / 8:00 a.m. PDT and will end Thursday, October 8 at 5:00 p.m. EDT / 2:00 p.m. PDT.

This year’s virtual conference will be presented live during the conference dates.

Sessions will also be recorded for post-event attendee access. Attendees will be able to log in to view presentations for up to 1 year after the event.

Daily conference schedule (all times are Eastern Daylight Time)

11:00 am – 12:00 pm Plenary Session
12:00 pm – 12:30 pm Break (facilitated virtual discussions)
12:30pm – 2:00 pm Concurrent Sessions I (3 tracks)
2:00 pm – 2:30 pm Virtual Coffee Break (facilitated virtual discussions)
2:30 pm – 4:00 pm Concurrent Sessions II (3 tracks)

4:00 pm – 4:10 pm Closing Remarks for the Day

(Thursday only) 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm Closing Keynote

In addition to a plenary session that will kick off each conference day, a total of 18, 90-minute concurrent sessions with 72 presentations (Four, 20-minute presentations per session) will be provided.

Virtual networking will be supported through our mobile and desktop App. NAISMA Staff, Board, and Planning Committee Members will facilitate live chats during sessions, breaks, and afterwards; Q&A at the end of all sessions. Topic-specific informal discussions during breaks will include aquatic invasive species techniques, outreach and education, policy, prevention tools, and more. 

Also new this year: an exhibitor demo session and a poster presentation lightning round.

Check back regularly for updates. Sign up for our monthly Early Detector email here.

Keynote Speakers

Tuesday, October 6, 2020 at 10:00 a.m. CT

Signature Invasive Species Initiatives at the U.S. Department of the Interior

Scott Cameron

Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy, Management, and Budget at the U.S. Department of the Interior

Invasive species pose substantial threats to the lands and waters managed by the Department of the Interior (Interior) and negatively affect the resources, services, and experiences available to the American public. Interior leads extensive efforts to manage invasive species and works closely with other federal agencies, states, tribes, territories, and other partners. This presentation will feature signature invasive species policy and program initiatives under this Administration. These include Interior’s Safeguarding the West from Invasive Species initiative, an intergovernmental effort to prevent, contain, and control quagga and zebra mussels in the western United States; Interior’s new Invasive Species Strategic Plan and companion invasive species policy; and regulatory improvements to promote efficient invasive species management activities across the nation. Interior also serves as the co-chair of the National Invasive Species Council (NISC), and the presentation will describe key achievements through NISC’s intergovernmental coordination across the federal family and provide an outlook on current and emerging priorities. Remarks will also highlight Interior’s new unified regions and associated benefits to interjurisdictional invasive species management efforts. Lastly, policy perspectives from working on invasive species issues in Washington, D.C., will be shared to inform future invasive species management, research, or policy initiatives.

 

Scott Cameron:

Scott J. Cameron has 40 years of experience working inside and around the federal government. He worked on the Transition Team for President Trump as part of the Landing Team and then the Beachhead Team for the Department of the Interior. He subsequently served as the Department of the Interior’s Acting Assistant Secretary for Water and Science. His current position at Interior is Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy, Management, and Budget. 

Scott has worked in both houses of Congress, in the Executive Office of the President, as a career civil servant, and as a political appointee in two administrations. He has worked deep in the bureaucracy and now twice in the Office of the Secretary of a cabinet department. He has consulted with federal agencies on management issues working for both large and small businesses, and served the State of California as Washington Representative for former governor Pete Wilson. Scott has also worked as a corporate government relations executive, and as an executive in non-profit organizations.  In November 2015, he became a local government elected official, being elected as a Director of the Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District, serving Fairfax County’s 1.2 million people. In 2014, he founded the Reduce Risks from Invasive Species Coalition, a 501(c)(3) charity that educates the public and government on the economic, ecological, and public health impacts of invasive species.

In his most recent prior federal service, Scott was a Deputy Assistant Secretary at the Department of the Interior.  There he served as Chief Human Capital Officer, E-Government Executive, had the lead on strategic planning and performance management, and was a member of the Executive Committee of the interagency Chief Acquisition Officers Council.  

Earlier, Scott was Deputy Chief of the Interior Branch at OMB.  In that capacity he also served as the program examiner for the US Geological Survey and US Fish and Wildlife Service. Earlier at OMB, he oversaw the EPA’s Office of Water and the Office of Research and Development.

From 1985 to 1989, Scott worked as a Legislative Assistant to U.S. Senator Chic Hecht (R-NV), handling all the energy, environmental, and natural resource issues for the Senator. 

Scott began his career as a Presidential Management Intern in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, after earning a BA in biology from Dartmouth College, and an MBA from Cornell University.  He is an elected Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration.

Wednesday, October 7, 2020 at 10:00 a.m. CT

Why Invasions are a Big Problem for Public Health

Shannon L. LaDeau

Associate Scientist, Disease Ecology
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Species invasions can threaten human health beyond the more commonly measured impacts on ecosystem health. Some invasive arthropods have had pervasive public health impacts. The spread of the emerald ash borer has been associated with increased mortality related to cardiovascular and respiratory disease in infested counties where it devastated urban tree canopies. Blood-feeding arthropods can have more direct effects on human health and species introductions contribute to a trend of increasing abundances and risk of vector-borne disease in urban and suburban communities. The U.S. experienced a rise in emergence of mosquito-borne disease over the past decade and while the pathogens are mostly introduced by infected humans, local transmission has largely relied on just a few species of non-native mosquitoes. This talk will explore how introduced species have historically and recently changed human disease risk in the U.S., with a focal case study on the introduced tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) and its influence on human communities across the United States.

 

Shannon L. LaDeau:

Shannon LaDeau is a disease ecologist who investigates how species interactions and environmental conditions influence the spread of pathogens. Current projects include work on how climate change regulates tick populations and Lyme disease, the ecology of mosquito vectors in complex urban risk-scapes, and viral transmission in wild fish-hatchery networks of the Pacific Northwest. Her research explores how environmental conditions shape populations of disease-carrying animals such as mosquitoes and ticks, with the goal of reducing human exposure to Zika, West Nile virus, chikungunya, Lyme disease, and other infections. LaDeau earned her PhD at Duke University and has been a Scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies since 2008. She is an Associate Editor-in-Chief for the Ecological Society of America’s journal Ecosphere.

 

Thursday, October 8, 2020 at 10:00 a.m. CT

Understanding Invasive Species Impacts: Lessons from Aquatic Ecosystems

Anthony Ricciardi

Professor of Biology, Redpath Museum and McGill School of Environment, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

Research has revealed that non-native species are invading lakes and rivers at increasing rates, yet we have certainly – perhaps greatly – underestimated the extent to which aquatic ecosystems have been invaded.  Furthermore, we have little knowledge of how the vast majority of these invaders have altered biodiversity, food webs, and ecosystem functions. A longstanding research goal is to understand why many invasions seemingly have only minor ecological consequences, while others have caused tremendous impacts on native species and ecosystems. Our ability to predict these outcomes is challenged by context dependencies that cause an invader’s impact to vary over time and space. I argue that a necessary step toward addressing the problem of context dependence is to adopt a research framework (hypothesis and experimental design) that explicitly considers the relationship of the invader to its physical and biological environment. Using this approach, experiments and field studies by my lab and others that have uncovered patterns that explain a substantive amount of spatial and temporal variation in impact. Another important lesson from research on aquatic systems is that invaders can interact synergistically with other invaders and various anthropogenic stressors. Some introduced non-native species can remain innocuous for years before suddenly becoming disruptive, apparently triggered by environmental change including another invasion. As ecosystems become increasingly invaded, impacts will become synergistic, more complex, and more difficult to forecast. This suggests that even a minor abatement of the invasion rate will yield disproportionate benefits for ecosystem management.

 

Anthony Ricciardi:

Dr. Anthony Ricciardi is Professor of Biology in the Redpath Museum and the School of Environment at McGill University, and a McGill Trottier Fellow in Science and Public Policy. He received his PhD from McGill (in 1997) and his postdoctoral training from Laval University (as an NSERC Fellow) and Dalhousie University (as a Killam Fellow). He joined the Faculty of Science at McGill in 2001 and was awarded a Quebec Strategic Professorship in 2002. Since 2016, he has also been an associate member of the Centre of Invasion Biology, Stellenbosch, South Africa.

For over 25 years, his research has examined the causes and consequences of biological invasions. In particular, he and his students have sought methods to predict the ecological impacts of introduced freshwater fishes and invertebrates. He has published 120 papers on these and other topics relevant to ecology and conservation. He has been on the editorial boards of the journals Diversity & Distributions, Biological Invasions, and Neobiota. From 2006 to 2016, he served on the scientific committee of the Canadian Aquatic Invasive Species Network – a government-funded research group that assessed the risks and mechanisms of biological invasion in Canada’s lakes, rivers and coastal waters. He is a recipient of the Frank Rigler Award, the highest honour given by the Canadian Society of Limnologists in recognition of major achievements in aquatic science. He is also one of the international experts writing the IPBES Invasive Alien Species Assessment, which will evaluate current global trends of invasions, as well as their impacts, drivers, and management, and propose new policy options for dealing with them.

 

Final Keynote Speaker

Thursday, October 8, 2020 at 3:00 p.m. CT

Integrating Economics, Ecology, and Human Behavior to Improve Invasive Species Management

Rebecca Epanchin-Neill

Senior Fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF) and visiting Associate Professor in Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Maryland

Biological invasions are driven by trade, travel and the movement of goods, and in turn affect ecological systems, economic activities, and societal well-being. Thus, ecological and economic analysis both play key roles in understanding invasion processes and identifying strategies to limit invasion introduction, spread, and impacts. This talk will highlight the role of economic analysis in designing effective invasive species policy, drawing on examples spanning invasion prevention, early detection and rapid response, and coordinated management of species spreading across the landscape. Integrated ecological-economic analysis helps identify the greatest “bang for the buck” when allocating scarce resources to invasive species management and can inform design of policies that more effectively account for stakeholder responses. I will highlight the contributions of diverse stakeholders to invasive species management and how policies can leverage these activities to improve outcomes across species and systems.

Rebecca (Becky) Epanchin-Niell

Rebecca (Becky) Epanchin-Niell is Senior Fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF) and visiting Associate Professor in Agricultural and Resource Economics at University of Maryland (Fall 2020/Spring 2021). Her research integrates economics and ecology to inform cost-effective environmental policy, addressing species conservation and invasive species management. She applies bioeconomic modeling, economic theory, and empirical analysis to inform policy design, illuminate economic and environmental trade-offs, and understand conservation decision-making. Her research emphasizes collaborations between natural and social scientists, and she works closely with diverse decision-makers and stakeholders from government, NGO, and private sector institutions to generate science that is useful and practical in real world settings. Her research on invasive species spans strategies to reduce the likelihood of pest entry, to early detection of established species, to cost-efficient and collaborative control of invaders spreading across the landscape. She received a B.S. in Earth Systems from Stanford University, M.S. degrees in Biology and Applied Economics from University of Nevada, Reno, and a Ph.D. in Agricultural and Resource Economics from University of California, Davis.

Field Trip Information

Explore the Crown of the Continent

Whitefish, Montana lies within the Crown of the Continent ecosystem that connects Banff National Park in Canada to Glacier National Park and the Bob Marshall Wilderness in the United States. Comprised of over 28 million total acres, the Crown of the Continent is the largest intact ecosystem in the contiguous United States.

All trips cost $45 and can be added to your registration.

Lunch is provided for all trips.

Field Trips

10:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Join Whitefish Legacy Partners for a 1-2 hour hike from the Lion Mountain trailhead.

Located conveniently near downtown Whitefish, this dry montane forest is botanically diverse and provides habitat for deer, mountain lion, bear, and an array of bird species. Explore the forested landscape and take in the views from the Skyles Lake Overlook on some of Whitefish’s most prized conservation lands with this 3 mile easy-moderate hike.

Unique to this trail is the Learning Pavilion and the Interpretive signs that explain the history of active logging by Montana’s Department of Natural Resources Conservation that improves tree growth and biodiversity, reduces fuel loading within the Wildlife Urban Interface, and supports the local schools.

The Whitefish Trails not only provide outstanding recreation opportunities close to Whitefish, it also connects vital corridors on private land to these larger swaths of public land.

To date, Whitefish Legacy Partners has partnered to permanently protect 4,500 acres of land surrounding Whitefish. These conservation easements support sustainable timber industry jobs, protect the land from parceling and development, and maintain the vibrant outdoor tourism economy of Glacier Country.

(Capacity 30)

11 am to 4 pm

The Flathead County Weed District, USDA Forest Service, Fish Wildlife & Parks the Dyer’s Woad Taskforce and the Working Dogs for Conservation are teaming up to provide an interesting and informative tour.

First stop of the tour will be at the Dyer’s woad site in Flathead County, where you will meet and see how the Working Dogs for Conservation work to find Dyer’s woad. Next stop will be a boat ride to Wildhorse Island on Flathead Lake where we’ll hear how and what weed control practices are utilized on this unique site. 

If time allows, we will end the tour back at the Flathead County Weed District Complex to get a look at their equipment and what techniques are used in this diverse county.

(Capacity: 40)

  • Wednesday, Oct 7th from 11:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • Friday, Oct 9th from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.


Lunch provided. Hiking/running/trail shoes, jacket and long pants recommended. 

Join Glacier National Park staff on a tour into one of Montana’s most iconic parks. First stop of the tour will be at Lake McDonald, where you will learn about the threats posed by aquatic invasive species and what types of prevention measures the Park has put into place to protect its waters.

Next stop will be a hiking tour of Rocky Point, a short but moderately challenging loop. Participants will be split into two groups, covering non-native plants, forest health, impacts of fire and aquatic invasive species monitoring and management.

(Capacity: 50)

Wednesday, October 7th, leaving the lodge at 10:30 AM and returning around 5 PM. Lunch provided.

Recommended Attire: Hiking/trail shoes, jacket and long pants.

Join biologists on Flathead Lake to learn about the Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes management of lake trout, an introduced fish species in the west.

Travel from Whitefish down the east side of Flathead Lake to Blue Bay, a campground and day use area operated by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. Participants will hear about the history and co-management of the Flathead Lake fishery, lake trout biology and the Tribes’ innovative management approach to lake trout, which includes both angler incentives with the ‘Mack Days’ derby and a commercial fishery, over lunch. From there the group will split into smaller groups in order to visit three separate tours on-site: take a boat ride on the netting vessels (weather dependent); tour the lake trout processing facility where the Tribe’s non-profit Native Fish Keepers Inc. filets, packs and freezes their fish for canning; and learn about flowering rush, an invading aquatic plant that is threatening Flathead Lake’s habitat and recreational access.

(Capacity: 30; minimum of 10)

  • Wednesday, Oct 7th from 11:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • Friday, Oct 9th from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

 

Join Glacier National Park staff on a tour into one of Montana’s most iconic parks. First stop of the tour will be at Lake McDonald, where you will learn about the threats posed by aquatic invasive species and what types of prevention measures the Park has put into place to protect its waters.

Next stop will be a hiking tour of Rocky Point, a short but moderately challenging loop. Participants will be split into two groups, covering non-native plants, forest health, impacts of fire and aquatic invasive species monitoring and management.

(Capacity: 50)

9:00am  – 3:00pm

Join Whitefish Legacy Partners and Whitefish Lake Institute for a 3-4 hour hike from the Beaver Lakes Trailhead to Beaver Lake.

Just 15 minutes west of Whitefish, this area is peppered with small, pristine lakes, beautiful forests, numerous vistas and provides vital habitat and seasonal migration corridors for large mammals including mountain lion, black and grizzly bear, and mule deer. This moderate 5-6 mile hike will visit the lakeshore of Beaver Lake and explore the 1,500 acre community conservation project, which through conservation easements, land exchanges, land use licenses and recreation use licenses, protects these lands from development and provides Whitefish with clean water, wildlife habitat, uncluttered views, thriving forests, and recreational opportunities that support the local economy.

The Whitefish Trails not only provide outstanding recreation opportunities close to Whitefish, it also connects vital corridors on private land to these larger swaths of public land.

To date, Whitefish Legacy Partners has partnered to permanently protect 4,500 acres of land surrounding Whitefish. These conservation easements support sustainable timber industry jobs, protect the land from parceling and development, and maintain the vibrant outdoor tourism economy of Glacier Country.

(Capacity 30)

Preliminary List of Sessions

The following are a preliminary list of sessions. More are in development and will be added as they are confirmed.

  • National and International Successes
  • Feral Swine: Successful Cross-boundary Prevention and Eradication Case Studies
  • Biocontrol 101: How it works and how to access agents
  • Invertebrates and Emerging Threats
  • New Technology and Industry Updates
  • New Terrestrial Invasive Species
  • New Aquatic Invasive Species
  • New Tools for Aquatic Invasive Species Management
  • Forest Pest Updates and Pests On The Horizon
  • Citizen Science Opportunities
  • Cooperative Weed Management Areas: Successes and Opportunities for Collaboration
  • Fire and Invasive Species
  • Invasive Species Policy Tools
  • Weed Free Forage and Gravel Program Update
  • Prevention Outreach Brands and Campaigns and How to Use Them
  • Mapping and Data Sharing

Registration

New pricing for virtual conference. If you registered previously, you will be refunded the difference.

Registration Pricing

Early Registration (through August 31)
  • Full Conference (non-member rate) | $325.00
  • Full Conference (+ add NAISMA membership) | $360.00
  • Full Conference – Student | $155.00
  • One-Day (non-member rate) | $190.00
  • One-Day – Student | $75.00
Late Registration (after September 1)
  • Full Conference (non-member rate) | $425.00
  • Full Conference (+ add NAISMA membership) | $460.00
  • Full Conference – Student | $195.00
  • One-Day (non-member rate) | $240.00
  • One-Day – Student | $115.00

Members get 10% off.

Not a member? Click here to join today, or register and choose “The Full Whitefish Experience + Membership” to get NAISMA membership included with your registration.

 
Agenda Add-ons

Available through the start of the conference (no price changes)

  • Field Trip/Tour | $45.00
  • Wednesday Not a Banquet | $45.00
  • Not a Banquet Dinner – Guest ticket for non-attendees | $40.00
  • Add NAISMA Professional Membership | $75.00
  • Add NAISMA Student Membership | $40.00

Members: check your email for special links to your discounted registration
Students: click here for 1-day registration
Students: click here for full conference registration and packages